Coronavirus update, Sept 29: Stanislaus has 2 more deaths. Case growth slow again

The COVID-19 pandemic is amplifying economic woes of low-income families and brought on new hardships for others, food banks feel the burden 

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LATEST FACTS ON COVID-19 TESTING IN MODESTO AREA

Stanislaus County reported two more deaths to the virus but continued to have just a small increase in the case count.

A total of 356 residents have died of COVID-19, according to the Health Services Agency.

The number of confirmed cases rose by 19 to 16,471. Another 87,338 residents have tested negative, and 15,859 are presumed recovered.

According to the county, presumed recovered cases are those who have been hospitalized and discharged; or cases that develop symptoms and 14 days have passed following symptom onset; or cases that never developed symptoms and 14 days have passed following specimen collection of their COVID-10 positive test. All other cases that are not presumed recovered are presumed active.

The county’s five hospitals had 50 confirmed cases of COVID-19 on Monday, up from 45 on Sunday. There were 11 available intensive-care beds for adults, down from 16 the day before.

 
State COVD-19

Stanislaus County remains in the lowest, or purple tier, in the state rating system that decides how much restaurants and other businesses can loosen its coronavirus restrictions.

Under the state’s grading system, Stanislaus County’s 5.5% positivity rate meets the 8% standard to be in the red tier, the third of four tiers. However, its 7.6 positive cases per 100,000 is above the seven cases per 100,000 needed to meet requirements.

Once the county moves up a tier into red, it would have to remain there for two weeks before it could enjoy the relaxing of some business restrictions like limited indoor dining and impacts on other sectors.

Of those who tested positive in Stanislaus County:

  • 54% are female
  • 46% male
  • 7% are 14 years or younger
  • 16% are ages 15 to 24
  • 21% are 25 to 34,
  • 18% are 35 to 44,
  • 15% are 45 to 54
  • 12% are 55 to 64
  • 6% are 65 to 74
  • 3% are 75 to 84,
  • 2% are 85 or older.
  • Though they make up 47 percent of the population, Latinos represented 64 percent of the positive cases.

Geographically:

  • Modesto has 6,110 positive cases
  • Turlock has 2,223
  • Ceres has 2,057
  • Riverbank has 825
  • Patterson has 801
  • Oakdale has 367
  • Newman has 335
  • Waterford has 252
  • Hughson has 146
  • Supervisorial District 5 has 1,036
  • District 3 has 932
  • District 2 has 733
  • District 1 has 353
  • District 4 has 111

In other nearby counties:

As of Monday evening, there were 811,141 confirmed cases in California and 15,613 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University. There were 7,147,241 U.S. cases and 205,031 deaths.

There has been some movement on the reopening of schools in previous weeks, with some having applied for waivers through the Stanislaus County Office of Education. Here also is the state list, which includes Stanislaus private schools seeking waiver approvals.

COVID-19 TEST RESULTS IN STANISLAUS COUNTY

Here is a two-week look at the results of the coronavirus tests in Stanislaus County by percent of positive test results, total tests and total positive tests. The source of the total tests and positive cases is the Stanislaus County Health Services Agency.

FAMILIES STRUGGLE TO GET FOOD

The COVID-19 pandemic has amplified the existing economic woes for low-income families and brought on unexpected financial hardships for the newly unemployed throughout the county. But school districts, nonprofit agencies and others are finding new ways to help.

PANDEMIC STALLS LITTER PICKUP EFFORTS

The state Department of Transportation conducted a major trash cleanup along the San Joaquin River in Stanislaus County last week. But Caltrans is still facing criticism over mounting litter problems along Highway 99 and its offramps into Modesto after the pandemic reduced the number of volunteer efforts to clean those areas.

LOVE MODESTO, DELAYED BY COVID, SEEKS HELPERS

Love Modesto, the annual citywide volunteer day, typically takes place in the spring. The coronavirus pandemic delayed the effort, which now will take place Oct. 3 with adjustments to keep participants safe.

CITY WILL REDO J STREET FOR OUTDOOR DINING

Modesto will reduce traffic to two lanes and put in angled parking to create space for restaurants and stores to expand into part of the road along several blocks of J Street, a major downtown thoroughfare.

FOSTER FARMS UPDATES TURLOCK TESTING

Foster Farms said fewer than 1% of its turkey workers in Turlock tested positive for COVID-19 earlier this month. Wednesday’s announcement came a few weeks after a serious outbreak among the company’s chicken plant employees in Livingston.

DETAILS ON NAIL SALONS, POP-UP TESTING

Tuesday brought the news that Stanislaus County remains in the most restrictive “purple” tier of California’s coronavirus reopening plan. There was a breakthrough for nail salons, which are now allowed to open with indoor service while taking precautions, state health officials said.

LASER QUEST MIGHT BE GONE FOR GOOD

Laser Quest in north Modesto has closed as part of its parent company’s decision to withdraw from the laser tag business. Some undisclosed locations might return under new ownership.

$2 MILLION IN GRANTS FOR NONPROFITS AVAILABLE IN STANISLAUS COUNTY

 

Stanislaus County nonprofits that provide arts and cultural programs or youth services have until Sept. 25 to apply for $2 million in CARES Act funds.

RESTAURANT PUSHES BACK AS $1,000 DAILY FINES PILE UP

Velvet Grill restaurants say they have not violated state law or created a public nuisance as they continue to serve customers indoors, defying state order.

PEOPLE ARE GETTING BACK TO WORK

Unemployment in Stanislaus County continues to fall, charting a course for a slow but long-term economic recovery from the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

FROM AROUND THE STATE, NATION AND WORLD

During the first months of the coronavirus pandemic, the World Health Organization estimated that each sick individual was infecting an average of two others. Now, new research from Duke University says the number was likely twice as big.

A nonprofit organization estimates about 500,000 deep-sea sharks may need to die to supply the world with a coronavirus vaccine when one proves safe and effective.

Hawaiian Airlines passengers flying out of San Francisco and Los Angeles will soon be able to get drive-thru COVID-19 tests before their flights to the Aloha State, the carrier announced over the weekend.

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